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Alice Faye Napier

GREENWOOD

Alice Faye Napier, 73, of Greenwood, passed away peacefully Sunday, March 25, 2018, at Greenwood Village South after a four-year stay due to a stroke. She was born to the late Alex and Lola Dye on April 4, 1944 in Arjay, Kentucky.

Alice married her lifetime partner, Carl Napier in 1962. She spent her life being a homemaker. She enjoyed fishing and doing puzzles. She dedicated her life to taking care of her family and home. Alice enjoyed traveling and going on vacations. A few of her favorite spots were the Smoky Mountains and Myrtle Beach. She loved going to watch her grandchildren play sports and other activities. Alice was a long-time member of the House of Prayer Tabernacle. She loved God and reading His word. Alice loved shopping, whether it was going to the stores or garage sales.

Alice is survived by her husband, Carl Napier of Greenwood; her four children, Jeff (Bonnie) Napier of Martinsville, Tim (Traci) Napier of Greenwood, Carl Napier of Greenwood, and David (Andrea) Napier of New Whiteland; one brother, Richard (Geraldine) Dye of Indianapolis; 12 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

A visitation will be Wednesday, March 28 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Jessen Funeral Home, Whiteland Chapel, 729 N. U.S. HWY 31, Whiteland, IN, 46184. A service will be Thursday, March 29 at 11 a.m. at the Whiteland Chapel. Burial will be at Forest Lawn Memory Gardens. To leave condolences go to www.jessenfuneralhome.com

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March 18 arts and entertainment

SSecond Tuesday of each month, unless otherwise noted: Greenwood’s Coloring (adults only) hosted by Dohnna Boyajian at Aromas Village Coffee, 7-9 p.m. Bring coloring pages, colored pencils and markers.

April 21, Rock ‘n’ Roll Cruisers cruise-in at Uptown fountain in Greenwood, 6 to 9 p.m.

May, TBA, Keith Jamison, opera tenor, Greenwood Performing Arts at GCT, 7:30 p.m., 864-227-8744.

May 13, Pan Harmonia Chamber Ensemble, described as “eclectic and genre-smashing” part of the free Festiva series at First Presbyterian Church of Greenwood, 4 p.m., 864-229-5814.

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Family Dentistry Brings Smiles, Laughs to Their San Juan Capistrano Office

The father-daughter dental team of Kaban Dental Group is serving up smiles and laughs at their family-owned business in San Juan Capistrano.

Lawrence Kaban, who jokingly calls his family’s practice a “necessary evil,” has been practicing out of the San Juan Capistrano office since 2004. Lawrence took over the Kaban office in 2004 from his also-dentist brother, Gerald, who decided to go back into the Air Force after opening the office on Paseo Adelanto in 1989.

The duo, father Lawrence Kaban, 69, and daughter Kelly Kaban, 30, have been working together since 2017 since Kelly finished dental school.

Father-daughter dental duo Lawrence Kaban (right) and Kelly Kaban (left). Photo: Emily Rasmussen

“Patients really like (the duo) because we joke around a lot and my dad likes telling stories,” Kelly said. “They come for the company and catching up. We work well together, I’m coming out of school with new things I’ve learned and (my father) has all of the experience. It’s a good combination.”

The dentist family’s roots started when Gerald and Lawrence went to Loma Linda for dental schooling, years before Kelly’s graduation also from Loma Linda in 2017. Since her father was an alumnus, Lawrence was able to hand Kelly the diploma and he also facilitated her first job in dentistry.

Kelly, who studied molecular environmental biology at the University of California-Berkeley, said the switch to dentistry has been great so far because of relationships created with patients. Some patients—which include prominent San Juan Capistrano families of multiple generations—date back to when Gerald first opened Kaban Dental Group nearly 30 years ago.

“We spend a lot of time with our patients,” Lawrence said. “They become family friends.”

In addition to creating a positive, good-humored environment—which Lawrence and Kelly agree can reduce anxiety of their patients, especially those who are fearful of dentistry work—every couple of months, the father-daughter team does free clinic dentistry work in Santa Ana for low-income patients.

To learn more about the Kabans, visit their office at 32124 Paseo Adelanto, Ste. 2 in San Juan Capistrano, or go to their website at www.kabandentalgroup.com.

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Parents who kiss children on lips before baby teeth develop may spread harmful bacteria, dentist argues

INDYPULSEParents who kiss children on lips before baby teeth develop may spread harmful bacteria, dentist argues

A dentist has advised that parents should refrain from kissing their children on the lips, particularly before their baby teeth have developed, as they could spread harmful bacteria to their young ones.

The debate over whether it’s appropriate for parents to kiss their children on the lips is a constant source of conversation.

While many argue that there’s nothing wrong with parents showing their affection in this manner, there are supposedly certain health risks that parents need to become more aware of.

Tom Brady kisses 11-year-old son on the lips sparking debate

Baby teeth are particularly susceptible to infection, as they don’t have the strength to withstand the damaging effect of bacteria.

“Baby teeth have a different type of enamel and dentine to adult teeth,” Dr Richard Marques, celebrity dentist at Wimpole Street Dental in London, explained to The Independent.

“The enamel is much thinner on baby teeth. It is not as strong as adult enamel so is more likely to decay.”

The transfer of saliva between individuals can always increase the likelihood of spreading illness.

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However, parents need to be especially wary with their young children.

“Saliva transfer from parent to child is a risk as this can spread bacteria (such as streptococcus mutans) from adult to child,” said Dr Marques.

“This bacteria can cause decay of baby teeth.

“It can even affect the soft tissues and gums before the baby teeth have developed!”

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There are a variety of afflictions that can be spread from mouth-mouth contact, including the cold or flu and viruses such as cold sores, which are caused by the herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1).

Dr Marques suggests that parents refrain from sharing cutlery with their children, blowing on their food or kissing them on the lips.

There are a number of things parents can do to ensure the optimal dental health of their children.

These include not keeping all of your toothbrushes in one container, making sure your child doesn’t swallow the toothpaste, reducing their sugar intake and taking them for regular dentists checks.

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“Take your child to the dentist regularly (they can go to the dentist as early as six months when the first tooth comes through),” Dr Marques advised.

“By age two to three they should be attending the dentist every six months to check for cavities (and check how well their teeth are developing!).

“Prevention is the key. We would rather help children to not get cavities in the first place!"

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